Sam Brotman, JD, LLM, MBA November 12, 2013 5 min read

IRS Form 1099: Informational Returns - Part One

Information returns are tax documents that businesses are required to file to report certain business transactions. Businesses are required to file these reports to the Internal Revenue Service. The requirement to file information returns is mandated by IRS and related regulations. “Any person, including a corporation, partnership, individual, estate, and trust, who make reportable transactions during the calendar year must file information returns to report those transactions to the IRS” (IRS.gov, “Information Returns by Form,” 8/31/2013). Persons required to file one or more information returns will also be required to furnish statements to their respective recipients (IRS.gov, “Information Returns by Form,” 8/31/2013). Filers with 250 or more recipients must file their returns electronically.

There are different types of information returns, specifically 1099s, which fall under the category, as well as rules for issuing them. Below is an overview of the different types.

IRS Form 1099-A

Form 1099-A, Acquisition or Abandonment of Secured Property reports information about the acquisition or abandonment of property used to secure a debt. All amounts are reported on the form by February 28. The lender, who is the filer, must submit a statement to the recipient, the borrower, by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-B

Form 1099-B, Proceeds from Broker and Barter Exchange Transactions reports sales or redemptions of securities, futures transactions, commodities, and barter exchange transactions. All amounts are reported on the form by February 28. The reporter must send a statement to the recipient by February 15.

IRS Form 1099-C

Form 1099-C, Cancellation of Debt reports the cancellation of a debt particularly “owed to a financial institution, the Federal Government, a credit union, RTC, FDIC, NCUA, a military department, the U.S. Postal Service, the Postal Rate Commission, or any organization having a significant trade or business of lending money” (IRS.gov, “Form 1099-C,” 8/31/2013). All amounts of $600 or more are reported on the form by February 28 and statements are sent to recipients by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-CAP

Form 1099-CAP, Changes in Corporate Control and Capital Structure reports information about cash, stock, or other property “from an acquisition of control or the substantial change in capital structure of a corporation” (IRS.gov, “Form 1099-CAP,” 8/31/2013). Filers must report amounts of stock and/or property valued at $100 million or more (IRS.gov, “Form 1099-CAP,” 8/31/2013). Amounts are reported by February 28; and statements are sent to shareholders by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-DIV

Form 1099-DIV, Dividends and Distributions reports distributions, which may be in the forms of dividends, capital gain distributions, and/or nontaxable distributions paid on both stock and liquidation distributions. Filers report amounts of $10 or more by February 28; statements are sent to recipients by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-G

Form 1099-G, Certain Government Payments reports unemployment compensation, state and local income tax refunds, agricultural payments, and taxable grants. Filers must report amounts of $10 or more for refunds and unemployment by February 28; statements are sent to recipients by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-H

Form 1099-H, Health Coverage Tax Credit (HCTC) Advance Payments reports health insurance premiums that are paid on behalf of individuals. All amounts are due by February 28; statements are sent to recipients by January 31.

IRS Form 1099-INT

Form 1099-INT, Interest Income reports interest income of $10 or more by February 28; statements are sent to recipients by January 31.

Continue to: IRS Form 1099: Informational Returns - Part Two

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Sam Brotman, JD, LLM, MBA

Owner and Director of Legal
Brotman Law

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